Contact
Join
Contributors

Subscribe in Feedburner
Subscribe in Bloglines
Subscribe in NewsGator Online
Subscribe in Google Reader


THE DAILY GUT TWITTER FEED
Follow The Daily Gut on Twitter
@thedailygut

THE GUT ON TWITTER
Follow Greg's tweets.
@greggutfeld

THE BIBLE OF UNSPEAKABLE TRUTHS
Greg's lastest book is availiable now.
amazon.com

THE ACTIVITY PIT
You can show more support for Red Eye, your friend Greg, TV's Andy Levy and Bill at the Activity Pit! Bring your own chaps and a poncho... Group tours meet up in Bryant Park at 4AM.
the activity pit

TAS ON TWITTER
The Arquette's Twittering
@arquettesisters

ANDREW BREITBART PRESENTS: BIG HOLLYWOOD
Check it out check it outers
big hollywood

KOREAN BBQ IN BROOKLYN
May burn your lips. Be careful
dokebi brooklyn

VOTE FOR SOMETHING WORTHWHILE
The Best Hamburger in NYC
random blog


Archive


   
1:43pm on Thursday the 20th of June
SOUNDS FUN
They lure children into dank swamps and devour them. They live in caves or among high rocks or deep in dense forests. They are covered with scales or thick fur. They have hands at the ends of their tails or a single glaring eye. They exhale fire, cause hurricanes with their wings or feast on human eyes, teeth and nails. They might also whimsically help the unwitting, but they are almost all mercurial, unreliable, tricksters.

Such are the mythic creatures of our earth. Their dwelling places are the journals of sea captains, the legends of native peoples, the myths of the Greeks, the folk tales of the Chinese. And it was a brilliant curatorial idea to devote an exhibition to them -- "Mythic Creatures: Dragons, Unicorns & Mermaids" -- which is opening at the American Museum of Natural History tomorrow, and which will, after January, travel to other museums that have collaborated on the project: the Field Museum in Chicago, the Canadian Museum of Civilization in Gatineau, the Australian National Maritime Museum in Sydney and the Fernbank Museum of Natural History in Atlanta...

The twisted, ivorylike elegance of a narwhal's horn -- which can be felt by a visitor -- might have been the inspiration for ideas about unicorns, as Scandinavian traders took these relics of sea creatures to European markets.
NYT digg this
It worked!

About the narwhal's tusk:

The purpose of the tusk has been the subject of much debate. Early scientific theories supposed that the tusk was used to pierce the ice covering of the narwhal's Arctic Sea habitat. Others suggested the tusk was used in echolocation. More recently, scientists believed the tusk is primarily used for showmanship and for dominance: males with larger tusks are more likely to successfully attract a mate.

Ain't that always the way.
16 Comments   Email Article



Girl NewsGreg's Unspeakable TruthComicarzy Site Design & Technology by Last Exit
Description - Topical, real-world opinion, from Greg Gutfeld