Contact
Join
Contributors

Subscribe in Feedburner
Subscribe in Bloglines
Subscribe in NewsGator Online
Subscribe in Google Reader


THE DAILY GUT TWITTER FEED
Follow The Daily Gut on Twitter
@thedailygut

THE GUT ON TWITTER
Follow Greg's tweets.
@greggutfeld

THE BIBLE OF UNSPEAKABLE TRUTHS
Greg's lastest book is availiable now.
amazon.com

THE ACTIVITY PIT
You can show more support for Red Eye, your friend Greg, TV's Andy Levy and Bill at the Activity Pit! Bring your own chaps and a poncho... Group tours meet up in Bryant Park at 4AM.
the activity pit

TAS ON TWITTER
The Arquette's Twittering
@arquettesisters

ANDREW BREITBART PRESENTS: BIG HOLLYWOOD
Check it out check it outers
big hollywood

KOREAN BBQ IN BROOKLYN
May burn your lips. Be careful
dokebi brooklyn

VOTE FOR SOMETHING WORTHWHILE
The Best Hamburger in NYC
random blog


Archive


   
11:07pm on Thursday the 18th of April
STUDENTS ARE SELF-OBSESSED ASSHOLES, SAY FORMER STUDENTS (serious editorial to follow!)
Today's college students are more narcissistic and self-centered than their predecessors, according to a comprehensive new study by five psychologists who worry that the trend could be harmful to personal relationships and American society.

"We need to stop endlessly repeating 'You're special' and having children repeat that back," said the study's lead author, Professor Jean Twenge of San Diego State University. "Kids are self-centered enough already."

fox19.com digg this

I have always believed that the worst thing you can do to a child is bolster his or her self-esteem. Not long ago a study was done comparing various levels of self esteem among different groups of people, and found that those who had the highest levels of self esteem were hardened convicts currently incarcerated in the roughest of prisons. Those who had very low levels were female 13 year old straight A students. (I would cite the actual study, but I am too busy trying to pick particles of my sandwich out of my keyboard).

Since the early 1970's we've become so overly concerned with "feelings," we've forgotten that they are transient and almost entirely worthless when it comes to achieving anything worthwhile in life.

And, it may be that feeling bad actually helps you to do good. An athlete, for example, may feel bad about his receding hairline - but if anything, it encourages him to be a better player as a way to compensate. This is also why unsightly people become comedians, writers, scientists and musicians. Plainness, and the rotten inner feelings it creates, is the single most powerful predictor for success, in my opinion.

Of course, I am devastatingly handsome...but in this case the exception proves the rule.

And so, if you tell someone - anyone, for that matter - that they have a right to "feel good," regardless of their achievements, you are feeding a loathsome monster who will do nothing but argue against those who deprive them of their right to feel special. The self-esteem movement, essentially, made weak people believe they'd all won the game, without ever actually suiting up.

I have met many people like this in my life, and I bet you have too. Some of them are close friends, who borrow money and rarely work, yet somehow believe they are simply undiscovered geniuses unnappreciated by the dimwitted robots who toil away in their dull, 9 to 5 jobs. I hate these people, and I try to stay as far away from them as possible. However, I respect and admire anyone who works hard for a living, knowing that self esteem has no place in this world, until of course they've done something to deserve it.

Like making a delicious peach crumble.

Here's my recipe:

Gather up 3/4 c. brown sugar, 1/2 c. flour, 1 1/2 tsp. cinnamon
1/4 c. butter and mix together to form the "crumble." Then grease a shallow pan with butter. Gently pour drained peaches into the pan. Then pour the crumble topping evenly over the fruit. Bake at 375 degrees for 25 minutes and you're good to go!

22 Comments   Email Article



Girl NewsGreg's Unspeakable TruthComicarzy Site Design & Technology by Last Exit
Description - Topical, real-world opinion, from Greg Gutfeld